Steven Clyde Mayfield 

October  5, 1951  -  December  2, 1998 at age 47

 

Born:   in Pasadena, Texas               
Entered Fire Department:
March 31, 1975
Duty:
Fire Fighter at Station #92 A Shift  
Buried:
Resthaven Cemetery, Section 7, Lot 587, Space 12 

Steve grew up in Denver Harbor on the eastside of Houston. He attended Austin High School. When he graduated, he moved out of the old neighborhood and, a few years later, he was able to qualify to be hired by the Houston Fire Department. He was following in the footsteps of his Father and his Uncle who were both Houston Fire Fighters.
 
After a few years Steve decided to become a paramedic. He worked on an ambulance for twelve years. He soon felt like he had been on the ambulance too long and gave up his paramedic status to become an EMT.

He left the EMS Division and went to Station 27 where he did not have to be on an ambulance everyday. In 1990, he was able to become an Airport Certified Fire Fighter and moved north of town to Station 54, which is located at the Intercontintal Airport Stations. In 1997, he transferred to Station 92, which is also an airport station. At Station 92 Steve was the only EMT and he had to work on MS 92, which was a pick-up that was equipped to respond to medical emergencies in all of the terminal; at Intercontinental Airport. He realized then that he was able to serve the public as he had done as a paramedic, but in a less stressful atmosphere.

Steve Mayfield is described by his co-workers as being dedicated to his profession and had been known to go above and beyond to help a citizen of Houston.

As an airport fire fighter, part of the job is to recertify annually in order to maintain his certification as required by the FAA. Part of the yearly process he and all airport fire fighters go through is a live burn that is done in Dallas at DFW Airport. The exercise proved to be too much for Steve. He was transported to a Dallas hospital. He died as the result of a heart attack.

When Steven Mayfield died, the Houston fire department had not had a paid fire fighter die in the last fifteen years.

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